ţʵ

tide noun

1 change in the level of the sea

ADJ. big, strong | flood, incoming, rising | ebb, outgoing | full, high | low | neap, spring

VERB + TIDE catch (= to take advantage of a favourable tide) We have to get up early to catch the tide.

TIDE + VERB be in | be out | come/flow in, rise | ebb, fall, flow/go out, retreat | be on the turn, turn | occur the time of day when the highest tides occur | wash sb/sth up The body was washed up by the tide the next day.

PREP. at … ~ Seals lie on the rocks at low tide. | on a/the ~ We went out to sea on the ebb tide.

PHRASES the ebb and flow of the tide

2 strong movement in favour of/against sth

ADJ. growing, rising the rising tide of crime | shifting | political He hasn't the courage to swim against the political tide.

VERB + TIDE go with | go/swim against | stem, turn (back) attempts to stem the tide of revolution

TIDE + VERB run Seeing the tide was now running in his direction, he renewed his campaign for reform. | carry sb/sth along | turn The tide of public opinion seems to be turning at last.

PREP. against a/the ~ It takes courage to speak out against the tide of public opinion. | on a ~ They were carried along on a tide of euphoria. | ~ against, ~ in favour of Civil liberties groups helped to turn the tide against industrial violence.

PHRASES a tide of history the shifting tides of history | the turn of the tide In the early 1990s there was a marked turn of the tide.