ţʵ

syllabus noun

ADJ. formal, official, prescribed | exam/examination, A level, GCSE, etc. | college, primary, school, secondary school, undergraduate, university | first-year, second-year, etc. | history, mathematics, writing, etc. | narrow, wide | overloaded

VERB + SYLLABUS design, develop, devise, draw up, plan, work out, write | follow, offer, teach, use The courses do not follow the syllabus of any particular examination board. Several schools in Britain already teach the baccalaureate syllabus. | follow, do, study Students do different syllabuses according to their ability. | change, extend, reform, revise, widen the need to revise the history syllabus | cover, get through It was impossible to cover the overloaded syllabus in a year. | stick to | depart from There is little time to depart from the syllabus. | fit/plan sth into, integrate sth into/with How can computer skills be integrated into the syllabus? | be based on | fit in with

SYLLABUS + VERB contain sth, cover sth, include sth Does the syllabus cover modern literature?

SYLLABUS + NOUN content, design

PREP. from ~ questions from last year's syllabus | in a/the ~ Let's include that in this year's syllabus. | on a/the ~ Is geometry on the GCSE syllabus? | under a/the ~ This period of history was not examined under the old syllabus. | ~ for some syllabuses for basic courses in geography | ~ in the exam syllabuses in arts subjects