ţʵ

rebellion noun

1 attempt to change the government

ADJ. full-scale, major | minor, small | general, open | armed | military, peasant, popular

VERB + REBELLION rise (up) in Simon de Montfort rose in rebellion in 1258. | launch, raise (literary), stage They staged a rebellion against British rule in Ireland. | set off, spark off The re-introduction of conscription sparked off a major rebellion. | foment, provoke (sb/sth to) attempts to foment rebellion in the Cabinet The new taxes provoked the population to open rebellion. | threaten The opposition party members threatened rebellion. | join | take part in | lead | support | crush, put down, quell, suppress

REBELLION + VERB occur Peasant rebellions occurred throughout the 16th century. | begin, break out Rebellion broke out in the Rhineland. | fail

PREP. in ~ They are in rebellion against the conservative hierarchy of the Church. | ~ against a rebellion against the new king | ~ over a rebellion over an increase in VAT

2 opposition to authority

ADJ. adolescent, teenage, youthful

REBELLION + VERB stir The band refused to go on stage and rebellion began to stir in the audience.

PREP. ~ against rebellion against their parents

PHRASES an act of rebellion, a form of rebellion