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disadvantage noun

ADJ. big, considerable, distinct, grave, great, main, major, manifest, obvious, real, serious, severe Lack of qualifications is an obvious disadvantage. | minor, slight | added, additional, further | long-term | competitive These requirements will have to be standardized if some banks are not to suffer a competitive disadvantage. | economic, educational, financial, racial, social the problems of racism, racial disadvantage and poverty

VERB + DISADVANTAGE experience, have, suffer (from) the disadvantage experienced by older people in the workplace The present system has the disadvantage that nobody really understands how it works. Competition has its disadvantages. | offset, outweigh The scheme's advantages outweigh the disadvantages. | overcome, remove | avoid | feel at a There was no reason for her to feel at a disadvantage. | place/put sb at a The fact that he didn't speak a foreign language put him at a disadvantage.

PREP. at a ~ We were at a distinct disadvantage compared with children from richer families. | despite a/the ~ Despite these disadvantages, many older people maintain an active social life. | to sb's ~ This change in the law will be to the disadvantage of small firms. | ~ for another disadvantage for the night-worker | ~ in There are disadvantages in using this treatment. | ~ to There are disadvantages to all those schemes.

PHRASES advantages and disadvantages Each plan has its own advantages and disadvantages.