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degree noun

1 measurement of angles

VERB + DEGREE rotate (through), spin (through), turn (through) The car had spun through 180 degrees on impact.

DEGREE + NOUN angle Place the shelf at a 90 degree angle to the wall.

DEGREE + NOUN through … ~s If you study the sky through 360 degrees you will see a whole range of colours.

2 measurement of temperature

VERB + DEGREE reach Temperatures inside the burning building are estimated to have reached 600 degrees centigrade.

PREP. at … ~s Water boils at 100 degrees centigrade.

PHRASES degrees above/below zero, degrees Celsius/centigrade/Fahrenheit, minus 10, 20, etc. degrees

3 amount/level

ADJ. considerable, exceptional, extraordinary, great, high, large, remarkable, substantial, surprising, unusual, the utmost the utmost degree of freedom | fair, moderate, modest It was possible to date these remains with a fair degree of accuracy. | low, minimal, slight, small He would try anything to make her even the smallest degree happier. | lesser The tax changes will especially hit those on high incomes and, to a lesser degree, small businesses. | varying keen amateurs who work hard, with varying degrees of success | alarming, dangerous, extreme His arguments are simplistic to an extreme degree. | acceptable, adequate, meaningful, real, significant The book fails to answer the question with any acceptable degree of certainty. | appropriate, necessary, proper, requisite, right | unacceptable

PREP. in … ~s The party leaders were all found to be corrupt in varying degrees. | of … ~ employees of various degrees of ability | to a … ~ The boss sometimes follows her instincts to a dangerous degree. | with a … ~ of We all tried to find out about the bus service, with varying degrees of success. | ~ of There is a degree of risk in any sport.

PHRASES by (slow) degrees By slow degrees, the company's turnover dwindled to nothing. | in (an) equal degree I felt excitement and sadness in equal degree as I waved goodbye to my colleagues. | a greater or lesser degree We were all disappointed to a greater or lesser degree. | to the nth degree (= to an extreme degree) The children tested her patience to the nth degree.

4 qualification

ADJ. college, university | first, ordinary, undergraduate | higher, master's, postgraduate, research | BA, BEd, BSc, MA, MSc, PhD, etc. | honours | pass | good, poor | first-class, (lower/upper) second-class, third-class Candidates must have at least an upper second class honours degree. | honorary | business, medical, history, law, philosophy, etc. | professional Candidates must hold a professional degree in architecture. | external | combined, joint, joint/combined subject, joint honours a joint honours degree in Business Studies and Modern Languages | modular | part-time

VERB + DEGREE have, hold | do, take He took a degree in law then joined a law firm. | be awarded, gain, get, obtain, receive | award sb, confer on sb The university conferred on him the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

DEGREE + NOUN course, level

PREP. ~ in a degree in economics